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Introduction to dutching and free dutching calculator (Betting Strategy)

  • Written by David Bet
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Betting strategy: introduction to dutching and free dutching calculator

In gambling, Dutching is sharing the risk of losing across a number or runners by backing more than one selection in a race or event. The process calculates the correct stake to place on each selection so that the return is the same if any of them wins.



INTRODUCTION TO DUTCHING


It is thought the strategy behind Dutching was originally conceived and employed by Arthur Flegenheimer (aka Dutch Schultz) alongside various rackets he had running at the racetrack. The system has since taken his name.

The strategy can pay dividends when gamblers successfully reduce the potential winners of an event to a select few from the field or when information about runners not expected to perform well does not reach the market (so as to affect the odds) making backing the rest of the field profitable.

Dutching techniques are often used to find two, or more, selections in a race or sporting event. Depending on the price and quality of the leaders in the field you could just dutch the top runners or maybe larger parts of the field. Dutching is useful if you want to oppose one or more horses but you are uncertain of the potential winner. There are several other scenarios in which you could put it to use.

Dutching isn’t just a horse racing strategy though. It also throws up opportunities on other sports such as soccer. Rather than making a judgement on a soccer match why not hedge your bets and dutch the correct score market? Dutching by excluding weak participants or outcomes that stand little chance of coming in you can turn a pretty useful profit.

Here you can find a Dutching calculator that perform the mathematics behind the system. This tool calculates the stakes that allow you to spread your stake around a few selections so as to win a level profit if either of them wins. Known as "dutching", this is a very efficient betting technique if you want to have your money riding on more than one selection. You can also use the Multilay calculator to dutch some likely losers.

FREE DUTCHING CALCULATOR







Dutching can be of two basic types: Back-Dutching and Lay-Dutching. The first one places back bets on the potential winners. The second one places lay bets on the horses that you think may lose.

EXAMPLE 1: Dutching Winners – Spread Your Bets Over The FavouritesThis example comes from a Formula 1 race which you think will almost definitely be won by one of 3 drivers – Alonso (4.00), Hamilton  (7.00) and Vettel (15.00). They are all best-priced on Betfair and there is plenty of liquidity available at these prices. You would like to spend £500 on all 3 bets.

If you follow the staking pattern recommended by Multiback, you would win £558.68 if either driver wins. This represents a return of 111.74%, which means that you are effectively backing the trio for a combined price of 2.12.

dutch1 Dutching Winners   Spread Your Bets Over The Favourites

EXAMPLE 2: Dutching Losers – Spread Your Bets Over The Likely LosersThis example shows you laying Murray (11.00), Wawrinka (16.00) and Tsonga (21.00) to win a small tennis tournament. You want to spend £100 betting that none of the selections can win.

Multilay instructs you to lay Murray for £9.55, Wawrinka for £6.56, and Tsonga for £5.00. The negative profit figure for each selection shows how much you would lose if one of the selections were to surprise you and everyone, and actually win the tournament. Your profit if neither wins is just the sum of the Lay stakes, which is £21.11. This means that you are effectively getting odds of just a shade over 1/5 that none of the selections will win.

layinglosers1 Dutching Losers   Spread Your Bets Over The Likely Losers

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